Week 15 Newsletter

Summer Newsletter
Week 15
Dear Robert,

 

Welcome to week 15!  There are some interesting goodies in the bag this week. First off is celery. We don’t see a lot of celery at Fresh Fork Market, so to have it in the regular bag is a real treat. It has much more flavor than the conventionally grown bunches. Enjoy it on its own or in a soup or chopped and added to nearly anything. 

 

Larges and vegetarians will see tomatillos. We have never carried these before, but thought it would be a nice treat. These were grown for us by Cleveland Crops. Cleveland Crops owns several properties around NE Ohio and grow a lot of veggies for chefs and restaurants. Not only do they own working farms in the heart of urban areas, but they employ developmentally disabled persons. So these tomatillos represent more than one of the core values of Fresh Fork Market. Try them fried (think fried green tomatoes) or make a salsa verde. They will hold for a couple of weeks in the fridge, just leave the husks on to help keep them fresh.

 

Trevor’s Corner
I just wanted to remind everyone that we have opened up sales for both Winter 2014/2015 and for Thanksgiving packages. 

Winter season is very different from the summer season. As you know, we don’t have much in the way of local produce. Not much grows under the blanket of Ohio snow. We will start out the season doing 3 weeks in a row. This way we can take advantage of the end of year crops and fall veggies. Then we go to every other week for the rest of the season. In total there will be 15 pickups and the total is $675. You can also pay in 2 payments of $357.50.

The winter season features more meat items, more value added items and some products that we put away in the freezer this summer for use in the winter packages.  It is a great way to eat local all winter.

Now for the turkeys.  We sell fresh turkeys every year. This year is no exception. I have a record number of them being raised right now.

We also did an early run to test out our heritage breeds. Last year, they grew very slowly, and we ended up with some small birds. This year, we raised a couple of batches early to see just how long this guys would take to get to the size we want. So this year, the heritage breeds will be smaller than the regular birds, but should be much bigger than last year’s birds. Heritage breeds are sold by weight and thus we only take a deposit with full payment due at pickup. 

In addition to just turkeys, we offer 3 different sizes of packages as well as pies. You can get just what you need for your family whether there are 4 of you or 14. To read all about our packages and turkeys, go here: Thanksgiving Packages

You can reserve your turkey or package with just a $25 deposit.

What’s In The Bag?

Small Omnivore
1 chicken
6 ears sweet corn
1 kohlrabi
1 head cauliflower
1 head green cabbage
1 bunch beets
1 bunch parsley
1 bunch celery
1 8oz bag purple filet beans
1 pint cherry tomatoes

Small Vegetarian
1 eggplant
1 spaghetti squash
1 quart yellow beans
2-3 heirloom tomatoes
1 bunch Swiss chard
1 head broccoli
1 quarter peck pears
6 ears sweet corn
1 kohlrabi
1 head cauliflower
1 head green cabbage
1 bunch beets
1 bunch parsley
1 bunch celery
1 8oz bag purple filet beans
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1+ pound tomatillos

Small Vegan
1 eggplant
1 spaghetti squash
1 quart yellow beans
2-3 heirloom tomatoes
1 bunch Swiss chard
1 head broccoli
1 quarter peck pears
6 ears sweet corn
1 kohlrabi
1 head cauliflower
1 head green cabbage
1 bunch beets
1 bunch parsley
1 bunch celery
1 8oz bag purple filet beans
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1+ pound tomatillos

Large Omnivore
1 chicken
6 ears sweet corn
1 kohlrabi
1 head cauliflower
1 head green cabbage
1 bunch beets
1 bunch parsley
1 bunch celery
1 8oz bag purple filet beans
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1 quarter peck pears
1 bunch Swiss chard
1 bunch kale
1 smoked gouda (8 oz)
2-3 heirloom tomatoes
1+ pound tomatillos

Large Vegetarian
1 eggplant
1 spaghetti squash
1 quart yellow beans
6-6 heirloom tomatoes
2 bunch Swiss chard
1 head broccoli
1 half peck pears
6 ears sweet corn
1 kohlrabi
1 head cauliflower
1 head green cabbage
1 bunch beets
1 bunch parsley
1 bunch celery
1 8oz bag purple filet beans
1 bunch kale
1 smoked gouda (8 oz)
2+ pound tomatillos

Recipes

Colcannon-Ohio Style
This recipe is great with just cabbage, but adding the other greens gives it a punch. You can use any greens, really, and you could sub the green onions for a leek or  a regular onion (chopped fine).

2+ pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks

Salt

5-6 Tbsp unsalted butter (with more butter for serving)

3 lightly packed cups of chopped kale, cabbage and/or chard, 

3 full green onions, minced (about 1/2 cup)

1 cup milk or cream

Put the potatoes in a medium pot and cover with cold water by at least an inch. Add 2 tablespoons of salt, and bring to a boil. Boil until the potatoes are fork tender (15 to 20 minutes). Drain in a colander.

 

Return the pot to the stove and set over medium-high heat. Melt the butter in the pot and once it’s hot, add the greens. Cook the greens for 3-4 minutes, or until they are wilted and have given off some of their water. Add the green onions and cook 1 minute more.

 

Pour in the milk or cream, mix well, and add the potatoes. Reduce the heat to medium. Use a fork or potato masher and mash the potatoes, mixing them up with the greens. Add salt to taste and serve hot, with a knob of butter in the center.

Cabbage and Red Lentil Dahl
Okay, so Dal is not really a local food. However, lots of folks get overwhelmed by a head of cabbage and wonder what to make out of it. If you are tired of coleslaw, cabbage and noodles, and the other dishes you usually make, try this Indian dish. Adapted from Madhur Jaffrey, Indian Cooking 

1 1/2 cups red split lentils (masoor dal), picked over, washed and drained
5 cups water
3 tablespoons high-oleic safflower oil
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
3 small dried red chili peppers
1 medium onion, peeled and thinly sliced
½ small head of green cabbage, cored and thinly sliced or shredded (4-5 cups)
1 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin (preferably freshly ground)
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon coriander or garam masala
Pinch asafetida (optional)
1 teaspoon dried fenugreek leaves (optional)
1 cup finely chopped or crushed tomatoes 
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly squeezed lime juice, optional

 

Put the lentils and water into a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes, until lentils are very soft.

 

Heat the oil over medium heat in a large skillet. Add ginger, garlic, mustard seeds and red chili, and cook for 1 minute. Add onion and cabbage and cook, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes until slightly browned. Stir in cumin, turmeric, coriander or garam masala, asafetida, fenugreek and salt and cook for 30 seconds. Add tomatoes. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add the cabbage mixture to the cooked lentils. Simmer 5 minutes. Taste, and if you want to add a bit more zip without adding more salt, squeeze in a little lime juice. Let the dal sit and thicken for 10 minutes or more, and reheat as necessary before serving.

Vegetarian Borscht

1 pound beets (beetroot), peeled and cut into matchsticks

2 medium onions, sliced into half-moons

2 large carrots, peeled and cut into matchsticks

3/4 pound white cabbage, cut thinly into shreds

2 tablespoons olive oil

5 cups vegetable stock

Juice of 1/2 a lemon

Salt to taste

Coarsely ground black pepper

Sour cream (optional, omit for vegan soup)

Finely chopped parsley or chives (optional, for garnish)

 

Peel and cut the onions, carrots, and beets (alternatively, shred the carrots and beets using the shredding blade of a food processor) and sauté over medium heat in the olive oil with a pinch of salt in a large soup pot. Reserve a small amount of beet to grate and add near the end to enliven the color.

 

In the meantime, bring the vegetable stock to a boil. When the vegetables are soft (about 5 minutes), add the shredded cabbage and the hot stock. Bring to a boil and simmer 15-25 minutes, until the vegetables are tender. With a few minutes left, add the reserved grated beet.

 

Season to taste with salt and pepper, then squeeze in the lemon juice, aiming for a pleasing but subtle sour taste. Serve with freshly grated black pepper, a dollop of sour cream, and chopped parsley, if desired.

Chicken and Swiss Chard Pasta Bake

1/2 pound whole wheat penne
3 bunches Swiss chard
3 tablespoons sunflower oil, divided 
1 onion, chopped
2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced
1 t2 2 cups cooked, shredded chicken
1 cup good-quality ricotta cheese
Splash dry white wine
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup panko crumbs
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Preheat oven to 375°. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil and cook pasta to al dente. Strain and set aside (toss with a bit of olive oil if you’d like).

 

Rinse the swiss chard well and pull the leaves off the thick stalks, discarding the stems. Tear leaves into large chunks and set aside.

Meanwhile, heat two tablespoons of oil in a large dutch oven or heavy stock pot over medium heat. Cook onions until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and saute for another 30 seconds. Add the swiss chard to the pot and season generously with salt and pepper. Stir a few times to wilt the greens. Cover and reduce heat to medium low. Cook until greens are tender, about 10 minutes.

Add the cooked noodles, chicken, ricotta, and a generous splash of white wine to the greens, and season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a medium-sized baking dish. Combine Parmesan, panko, and remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sprinkle the Parm mixture over the top of the casserole and bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until the top is golden.

Curry Roasted Cauliflower
Curry works well with cauliflower, so this makes a great dish!
Ingredients:

  • 1 medium to large head cauliflower
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder, your favorite blend
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt and pepper

Preparation:

Line a large baking pan with foil; spray lightly with cooking spray. Heat oven to 425°.In a large bowl or food storage bag toss the cauliflower florets with the olive oil, curry powder, and cilantro. Spread out on the baking sheet and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper.Roast for about 25 minutes, turning every 10 minutes, or until tender and lightly browned.

Celery Soup 

1/2 cup minced onion

2 TBS butter or oil

8-10 stalks of celery, washed and root ends removed

½ cup fresh parsley leaves

½ tsp dried thyme

1 cup chicken stock, optional

Salt and pepper

 

Heat the oil or butter in a heavy bottom pan.  Add the onions and cook over medium low heat, stirring often.  Add the thyme and parsley leaves.  Chop the celery and add it to the pot.

 

Add chicken stock if using and 4-5 cups of water.  Raise the heat to medium high.  Cook the soup for about 1 and ½ hours.  It should bubble just a little but not boil.

 

Purée the cooked soup and season it with salt and pepper.  Or you can serve the soup more peasant style without puréeing it.

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Cauliflower

We often get an assortment of cauliflower. Most common is the white variety, but you might also see purple, green or even yellow. I am sure that some of you out there can tell the difference, but to most of us, it will all taste the same.

Cauliflower is high in fiber, folate, water and vitamin C, while remaining low in carbs and fat. Although it doesn’t have the same amount of starch, if you are watching your carb intake, try replacing cauliflower for potatoes. 

Most people only consume the head, but the greens are also edible. I find them quite tasty. Simply cut out the thick rib and treat like any other green.

Cauliflower is great roasted, steamed, sauteed, braised, and baked. We have a large selection of recipes on our site, so check them out here:
Cauliflower recipes

Tomatillos

Tomatillos are related to gooseberries, and are a member of the nightshade family. They are eaten fried, boiled or steamed. You are probably most used to seeing them in green salsa.

Try one of the recipes from Allrecipes.com.

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